AUTODESK SUBASSEMBLY COMPOSER PDF

But first we need to talk about variables and so I am going to sneak this discussion in as Part 2 and conditionals will have to wait for Part 3. I am sure everyone has spent all weekend playing with the Subassembly Composer because it can be downloaded to your home computer while Civil3D sits all alone on your work computer back at the office all weekend. You are a regular expert at putting points and links into the flow chart and even using a sequence or two, You did read my comment on the last post that you can nest sequences, right? Here is the Input Parameters tab for the subassembly that I shared on Friday. You can make a variable name and then a type and a default value. For types there are 4 to chose from: Double: This is probably going to be your most common variable type.

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But first we need to talk about variables and so I am going to sneak this discussion in as Part 2 and conditionals will have to wait for Part 3.

I am sure everyone has spent all weekend playing with the Subassembly Composer because it can be downloaded to your home computer while Civil3D sits all alone on your work computer back at the office all weekend. You are a regular expert at putting points and links into the flow chart and even using a sequence or two, You did read my comment on the last post that you can nest sequences, right? Here is the Input Parameters tab for the subassembly that I shared on Friday.

You can make a variable name and then a type and a default value. For types there are 4 to chose from: Double: This is probably going to be your most common variable type. A simple number with decimals allowed. Integer: An integer variable will only allow whole numbers. Personally I would always use a double and let the user not be limited to whole numbers but maybe someone will find a case where an integer is preferable. You can use these in conjunction with the conditionals.

They give you the opportunity to set up multiple scenarios for the user. For example, you can make a boolean variable called UseSubbase and if it is set to true it will use your sequence to make points and links for the subbase and if it is set to false it will ignore that part of your flow chart. String: At first I had a hard time thinking of when you would want a string variable.

A string variable is text. All right so you made a bunch of Input Parameter variables, now lets see them put to use. This is probably the most simple use of an input variable. Here I used it to define the offset of my point P1 from the Origin application point. As one would expect, a negative sign in front of the variable will make it offset to the left and a negative sign in front of the delta elevation will make it offset down.

What I had expected to work with SlopeAndDeltaElevation was if I set a positive elevation and a negative slope it would be up and to the left as I wanted but sadly it always wanted to be up and to the right no matter whether the slope was set to positive or negative.

Thankfully I did find a nice little work around as you see above but I also wandered my way over to the Autodesk Discussion Forum for the Subassembly Composer and told them my problem so that it can be fixed. Ask and ye shall receive or at least some of the time. You can reference these top secret output variables for a point ex. P1 by typing SubassemblyGeometry. I know what you are asking, but Kati, if these are top secret variables how do you know about them!?

Well there is a wealth of knowledge out there and I came across the suggestion to use SubassemblyGeometry. I would love to know if there are more top secret output variables but these two will come in handy when we talk about decisions and conditionals in Part 3!

Stay tuned!

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Learning Autodesk Subassembly Composer

This is a blog about Autodesk Civil3D. I had taken a couple overview classes at Autodesk University this last year, and have been using ever since. SAC allows users to create their own fully functioning custom subassemblies that can range from very simplistic to extremely complicated with various programming built in. These custom subassemlies can be huge time savers on projects. Subassembly Composer Overview The SAC program has a fairly simplistic interface with various panels that can be moved around the screen for customization.

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Autodesk Subassembly Composer

By thinking about what your project needs in each phase of the project design you can make subassemblies that work for you. In conceptual design, you want to understand the site and visually see what you have to work with. As you progress into preliminary design, you want to gather information and start to make decisions to generate your design concept. As the design progresses, subassemblies can start to make more decisions for you. And with final design around the corner, you will finesse your design with a complete composite assembly with both your custom subassemblies and out-of-the-box subassemblies working together.

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