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Back to top What is boar taint? Boar taint is an unpleasant odour or taste that many consumers would notice if they cooked or ate pork from male pigs that had reached puberty. It has been compared to the smell of urine, faeces and sweat. Boar taint most often occurs in pork from male pigs that were not castrated.

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It is adjuvanted with a synthetic aqueous adjuvant to increase the level and duration of immunity. Indications: Improvac Boar Taint Vaccine for Male Pigs is used to control boar taint caused by the accumulation of taint substances including androstenone and skatole in entire male pigs.

Through its inhibitory effect on GnRF Gonadotrophin Releasing Factor and testosterone production, Improvac Boar Taint Vaccine for Male Pigs also modifies the behaviour of peripubertal male pigs which may be evidenced by increased weight gain during the post-vaccination pre-slaughter period. This increased weight gain may also result in an increase in fat deposition. General Directions: This product is contraindicated for use in breeding stock.

Inadvertent vaccination of male breeding stock may affect subsequent fertility. The dose on all occasions is 2 ml, injected subcutaneously. The recommended site for injection is at the base of the neck, immediately behind the ear. Primary Vaccination: Two doses of vaccine should be administered to entire male pigs at an interval of at least 4 weeks. The second dose should be given 4 to 5 weeks prior to slaughter. The above recommendations on method and timing of vaccination, and injection site should be closely followed to ensure optimum effect and minimise carcase damage.

Effective immunity the development of anti-GnRF antibodies develops approximately 10 to 14 days after administration of the second dose. The second dose, at least 4 weeks after the first dose, is essential to limit the further production of taint substances.

The second dose of vaccine must be given 4 to 5 weeks prior to slaughter to control taint substances already present in the carcase. Entire male pigs intended for slaughter at 26 weeks of age will therefore receive their second dose of vaccine at 21 to 22 weeks of age, their first dose of vaccine having been given at 17 to 18 weeks of age or earlier. Only for use in male pigs. Keep out of reach of children, uninformed persons and animals. Accidental self-injection may affect fertility in both men and women and pregnancy.

Not to be administered by women of childbearing age. Care should be taken to avoid accidental self-injection and needle-stick injury when administering this product. In the event of accidental self-injection, seek medical advice immediately.

Some swelling may develop at the site of vaccination, and in a small proportion of pigs, may last for several weeks before gradually subsiding. This vaccine has been fully tested for potency, sterility and safety before issue but it must be stressed that the correct vaccination procedure in the field is equally important if secondary infection is to be prevented.

This may lead to stock losses, but fortunately is of rare occurrence. Uncommonly, environmental sources of skatole can also contribute to taint, equally affecting females, castrates and entire male pigs.

The major predisposing factor to this is absorption of skatole through the skin in a wet and soiled environment. Certain feedstuffs have also been implicated as a source of high skatole levels in the carcase. Although this vaccine has been extensively tested under a large variety of conditions, failure thereof may ensue as a result of a wide range of reasons.

If this is suspected, seek veterinary advice and notify the registration holder.

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Male pigs from 8 weeks of age. For use as an alternative to physical castration for the reduction of boar taint caused by the key boar taint compound androstenone, in entire male pigs following the onset of puberty. Another key contributor to boar taint, skatole, may also be reduced as an indirect effect. Aggressive and sexual mounting behaviours are also reduced. The onset of immunity induction of anti-GnRF antibodies can be expected within 1 week post second vaccination.

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It is adjuvanted with a synthetic aqueous adjuvant to increase the level and duration of immunity. Indications: Improvac Boar Taint Vaccine for Male Pigs is used to control boar taint caused by the accumulation of taint substances including androstenone and skatole in entire male pigs. Through its inhibitory effect on GnRF Gonadotrophin Releasing Factor and testosterone production, Improvac Boar Taint Vaccine for Male Pigs also modifies the behaviour of peripubertal male pigs which may be evidenced by increased weight gain during the post-vaccination pre-slaughter period. This increased weight gain may also result in an increase in fat deposition.

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